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Welcome to the portion of this webstore for the Cooperman Company line of "HistoryLives" products. This store is open to members of the museum store and gift shop trade only. If you would like to enter this site, please email us at info@cooperman.com with your business details to obtain log-in credentials. For more information on the Cooperman Company and this line of HistoryLives products, please go to www.historylives.com, which is open to all for product descriptions and more about our company and our mission.
 
 
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Our top selling items are grouped here for your convenience. Our customers who are familiar with these items can streamline the process by using this checklist, and new customers can quickly order a sampling of our favorites. For orders of over 100 pieces per item, please use the regular webstore listing to see quantity pricing and place orders.
The rich musical traditions of these folk instruments continue in an unbroken line from early American to the present. All of these instruments except the harmonicas are generally appropriate for all early American time periods; harmonicas are most appropriate from the early 1800s on.
Just like children today, boys and girls in early America enjoyed simple toys and games that could be played alone or with others. We have chosen to make timeless toys and games that were popular from early times right through modern day, with activities ranging from the athletic Game of Graces through the thoughtful Bilbo-Catcher toy.
The citizen-soldier is a fundamental concept of the American army. In early American times most free men would have been very familiar with firearms - a working firearm was a prized possession, indispensable in everyday life to the hunter, farmer, or frontiersman, and often a finely crafted, costly status symbol for the gentleman sportsman. While soldiers in a standing army might have been issues the latest in firearms and ordnance, the militiaman and countryman often had to make do with whatever was at hand. Occasionally wives and children would follow their menfolk to the military camps, and evidence of domestic life is often found at military campsite excavations.
Commonplace items open a window for us into the culture of early America. The coins that were used in trade, household items like quill pens, and even small nods to vanity like the ostrich plumes, all speak volumes about the everyday lives led by early Americans.